Registering Properties

Here you will find information on how to register properties to the local, state, and/or national register of historic places, or establish a district. For information on researching historic property, visit the Historic Surveys page.
Local Register

Local Register


The city's historic preservation ordinance, Ordinance No. 6065, provides a process for the designation of locally-significant historic structures, sites, and districts through a public process involving the Historic Resources Board and the City Commission. Designation is established by an ordinance which must identify significant historic features on the property or properties. For more information, see the City Code of Ordinances Section 17.5-16

Designation of locally-significant historic structures, sites, and districts can be initiated by a member of the Historic Resources Board, the owner(s) of record of the nominated property, the City Commission, or any other person or organization. Once designation occurs, any improvements made to significant historic features on the structure, site, or buildings within a historic district must obtain a Certificate of Appropriateness, which is issued by the Historic Resources Board (City Code of Ordinances Section 17.5-17).

Nomination


To nominate a structure, site, or district to the Local Register, complete the Nomination Form and return it to the City of Manhattan Community Development Department for processing. Filing Instructions are available.
State Register

State Register

The Register of Historic Kansas Places is our state’s official list of historically significant properties. The same general criteria used to assess the eligibility of a property for inclusion in the national register are also used to assess eligibility for the state register (see National Register information below), but more flexibility is allowed in the interpretation of the criteria for eligibility. Properties eligible for the register generally retain their historic appearance, are at least 50 years old, and have the potential to be documented as historically or architecturally significant at the local, state, or national level. Many types of properties are listed in the register, including barns, banks, courthouses, libraries, houses, parks, ranches, battlefields, hospitals, roads, bridges, rail depots, and archaeological sites. Manhattan has over 30 properties on the register. Properties listed on the State Register are eligible for tax credits and grants for work relating to rehabilitation and preservation. The State Register is administered by the State Historic Preservation Office.

Nomination 

To nominate a property to the State Register, follow this step-by-step guide to the process.


National Register

National Register

The National Register of Historic Places is the country’s official list of historically significant properties, which must meet one or more of the four criteria for evaluation. Properties eligible for the register generally retain their historic appearance, are at least 50 years old, and have the potential to be documented as historically or architecturally significant at the local, state, or national level. Many types of properties in are listed in the National Register, including barns, banks, courthouses, libraries, houses, parks, ranches, battlefields, hospitals, roads, bridges, rail depots, and archaeological sites. Manhattan has nearly 30 properties on the register. The National Register is administered by the National Park Service. A property must first be nominated and listed on the State Register (see above) before being considered for the National Register. Properties listed on the National Register are eligible for tax credits and grants for work relating to rehabilitation and preservation.

Nomination 

To nominate a property to the National Register (via the State Register), follow this step-by-step guide to the process.


Historic Districts

Historic Districts

A historic district is a concentration of historic buildings, structures, sites, and/or objects united historically or aesthetically by plan or physical development. Individually, the properties or resources in a historic district may not have particular historical, architectural, engineering, or archaeological distinction, but the collection must have significance in one of these areas.  Common examples of historic districts include collections of downtown commercial and civic buildings, residential neighborhoods, and industrial complexes. 

Nomination


Districts may be nominated at the local level (see Local Register section above) or at the State and National level. For more information on establishing a State or National Historic District, see the Kansas Historical Society webpage.